The Crazy Love of Silver Linings Playbook: Steve Recommends One of 2012’s Best Movies

You’d have to be crazy not to love Silver Linings Playbook. It is one of the very best movies of 2012. In many ways, it is a typical romantic comedy slpor maybe dramedy, but any movie written and directed by David O. Russell is not going to be simply typical. Anyone who has seen one of his off kilter comedies, such as Flirting with Disaster or I Heart Huckabees, or his gritty drama, The Fighter, knows that he brings an edge to everything he does, even to a rom-com. It is that edge that elevates this film from being merely typical to being one of the year’s best.

In this case, the edginess comes from the struggles with mental illness facing the lead characters, Pat (Bradley Cooper) and Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence). Although these struggles occasionally lead to humorous moments, fortunately they are not simply played for laughs. The difficult issues that face those afflicted with mental illness, as well as their families and friends, are taken seriously. Thus, the love that arises here is not simply the sweet feeling of most rom-coms, but is a gift with healing power. This makes Silver Linings Playbook not only one of the year’s best, but also one of the most hopeful.

Russell provides a solid script. Even though it falls into rom-com clichés at times, overall it has emotional depth. His earthy direction adds to the emotional resonance. He certainly puts his stamp on the movie, but for a movie like this to work the acting performances are vital and Russell’s actors serve him well. So well that they are represented in all four acting categories at the Oscars, which is a rare achievement. Cooper impressed me with his ability to portray Pat’s bipolar mood swings, from the anger and rage to the euphoria of seeking his silver lining. Cooper’s natural charm makes it possible to like Pat, even though there are plenty of reasons to dislike him. As solid as Cooper’s performance is, the movie truly takes flight when Lawrence arrives onscreen. Even as she deals with grief and depression, using sex in a misguided attempt find solace, Lawrence’s Tiffany electrifies every scene in which she appears. Her ability to project hope in the face of great hurt gives credence to the possibility that anyone can find a silver lining. This young woman deserves an Oscar. (How moved was I by her performance? I cried tears of joy when she won the SAG award!)

Lawrence and Cooper make the movie work. Robert DeNiro (Pat Sr.) and Jackie Weaver (Dolores, Pat’s mother), along with the rest of the solid cast, give it the depth that moves it to the level of greatness. Pat Sr.’s own neuroses are on clear display, including his obsessive compulsions, especially related to his superstitions regarding his beloved Philadelphia Eagles and what it will take for them to win, along with his gambling addiction. This is vital because it reminds us that mental illness is not a black and white issue, but rather a spectrum that affects all of us in some way. I’m a survivor of both cancer and clinical depression, so I understand the connection between physical and mental illness. Neither one can be easily compartmentalized. They both affect a person physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually and, therefore, the healing must also touch upon all those aspects. What I experienced with the clinical depression was different from other times of depression in my life, but it was a difference of degree, not of kind. Pat Jr.’s condition was diagnosed, but seeing him along with Pat Sr. reminds us that we all have issues to deal with. As Pat’s psychiatrist tells him, we need a strategy for dealing with the bumps along life’s road. It is my belief that the strategy is grounded in the faith, hope, and love that Paul writes about in 1st Corinthians 13.

Of the four actors in Silver Linings Playbook receiving Oscar nominations, some folks are amazed that Weaver was recognized for her work as supporting actress. Admittedly, she doesn’t say much, but no one no one acting today shows more emotion through facial expression and body language. I love her work here, as I did in Animal Kingdom (for which she also received an Oscar nomination.) Regardless of the nod from the Academy, her role is crucial. She plays the classic enabler, doing whatever is necessary to keep the family functioning in the midst of the craziness. Being an enabler means that one is also in denial, which is on clear display at the beginning of the film when Dolores checks Pat out of the mental institution before he is ready to go. Do you ever prefer to cover up a problem, pretending that it isn’t as serious as it is, rather than face what is necessary for healing and wholeness?

Often in life our struggles are passed on from parent to child, through both genetics and learned behavior. (This can be quite scary for a parent. Sorry, boys!) Pat inherits his father’s compulsiveness and anger issues, as well as his mother’s denial. Pat believes his silver lining will be found through reconciliation with his wife, despite the fact that it was beating up the man she was having an affair with that landed him in the mental institution. He takes the blame for her infidelity and believes that if he can prove to her that he is now a better man then she will take him back. Pat clings to this dream despite clear signs that it isn’t going to happen. Certainly, one of the trickiest things in life is knowing when to pursue a dream and when to let it go. Are you clinging to any impossible dreams that are keeping you from experiencing the very real joys that are available to you?

In addition to all the other wonderful stuff in this movie, Russell has done a great job in compiling the soundtrack. Bob Dylan’s duet with Johnny Cash on ‘Girl from the North Country’ plays during a key scene and there are three Jack White songs (two White Stripes and one Dead Weather.) I will never again hear Stevie Wonder’s ‘My Cherie Amour’ without thinking of this movie. But that’s alright, because being reminded of this fine film will be a good thing. Case in point: the sequence leading up to the climax felt contrived, yet it had me on the edge of my seat and then the tears started flowing. The bottom line for me in a movie like this involves two interrelated issues, do I care about the characters and does it make me cry of hope and joy? Obviously, the answers for Silver Linings Playbook are yes and yes! Silver linings, indeed!

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